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Recipes — freeze dried cauliflower

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5 Cauliflower Recipes for a Healthy Dinner Night In 0

cauliflower recipes
Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

By now, it's pretty obvious that cauliflower is here to stay. The once ignored root has turned into the "it" vegetable of the decade (sorry, kale!) and continues to wow us by proving just how adaptable and delicious it can be. And yet, this is just the beginning. The veg(1) is also rich in nutrients like fiber, vitamin C, and choline, which means it can do anything: from boosting your brainpower(2) to improving digestion(3) to reduced cancer risk(4). So, in light of the coronavirus pandemic (and flu season), we rounded up our five favorite (read: delicious) cauliflower recipes to help you get some of the "flower power" in your life – and (why not?) fall in love with the veg.

1. Cauliflower Frittata with Feta

At less than ten ingredients, this cauliflower recipe sticks to basics but tastes anything but. Sure, the combination of cauliflower, Feta cheese, and roasted breadcrumbs doesn't seem like it would work. But, our taste buds beg to differ! PS: If you are a fan of spicy flavors, top the frittata with some hot sauce for an extra kick.

Ingredients:

Directions:

  1. In a bowl, add the cauliflower and 2 cups of warm water. Soak for 15 minutes, remove from the bowl, and transfer to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Add the breadcrumbs as well. Drizzle the bites with olive oil, ground coriander, and ¼ teaspoon of garlic. Bake in a pre-heated oven (400oF) for 25-30 minutes or until the cauliflower turns brown. Remove from the oven and let cool.
  2. Add the cream and eggs to a bowl and mix well. Whisk in parmesan, Feta cheese, and remaining garlic, and season accordingly. Pour the batter into a frying pan and top with the roasted cauliflower and breadcrumbs. Cook for 20-25 minutes or until the edges are brown and the center is cooked through. Serve immediately.

2. Cauliflower Mac and Cheese

This dish may not be the creamy noodle dish you ate while growing up, but it certainly takes its cheese commitment seriously. But, that's not all. In addition to fiber-rich cauliflower, it also features celery and tomato flakes, which ups the dish's flavor and nutrients.

Ingredients:

Directions:

  1. Add the cauliflower to a bowl along with 3 cups of warm water and soak for 15 minutes. Remove from the bowl and squeeze away excess liquid. Set aside.
  2. In a pan, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the celery, cauliflower, and tomato flakes, and saute for 10 minutes or until the florets turn soft (but not brown). Stir in the flour, milk, and 2 cups of water, stirring all the time. Simmer for 10 minutes and season with salt, pepper, and paprika. Before you remove the pan from the stove, stir in the cheese. Set it on a hot surface to keep it warm.
  3. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to the package's instructions. Reserve one cup of the cooking water before you drain the pasta.
  4. Preheat the oven to 350oF.
  5. Add the pasta water, pasta, and cauliflower "sauce" to a casserole dish, and mix well. Bake for 30 minutes or until golden.

3. Cauliflower Chowder

It's true: Cauliflower chowder isn't one of those dishes that pop into your mind when winter rolls around. But, this hearty version will become your new go-to, mainly because of its simple set of ingredients. It's also rich in immune-boosting nutrients thanks to all the veggies, so you get the best of both worlds in just a few slurps.

Ingredients:

Directions:

  1. Add the cauliflower and bacon to a bowl along with 4 cups of warm water. Soak for 15 minutes. Once hydrated, squeeze away excess liquid, and transfer to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Drizzle with olive oil, season, and roast for 25-30 minutes in a pre-heated oven (400oF). Remove and set aside.
  2. In a pot, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the onion, carrots, celery, and garlic, and sauté for 2-3 minutes. Stir in the cauliflower, bacon, and thyme, and cook for 3 more minutes.
  3. Add the flour to the pot and stir for a while. Pour the broth and let it simmer for 10 minutes. Stir in the milk and cheese and keep stirring until the chowder turns creamy. Remove from the stove and serve immediately.
  4. (Optional Step) If you want the chowder to be thicker in consistency, dunk an immersion blender in the pot and puree the vegetables.

4. Cauliflower Bolognese

We may be used to topping our noodles with meat. But, in recent years, veggie-filled pasta has amassed quite a following. And honestly, we get it as these dishes can taste just as good as the real deal. If you don't believe us, check out this recipe! Swapping meat for veggies, this unusual take on the classic Bolognese gets its chewy texture from cauliflower, mushrooms, and some surprising add-ins.

Ingredients:

  • 10 ounces rigatoni pasta, uncooked
  • 2 ½ cups freeze dried cauliflower pearls
  • 1 cup freeze dried mushrooms
  • ¼ cup tomato paste
  • ¾ cup diced tomatoes (try our dried tomato flakes/ dices)
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1 large onion, peeled and finely chopped (try our dried chopped onions)
  • 1 tsp dried garlic (granulated)
  • 2 tbsp parsley, finely chopped
  • ½ tsp dried rosemary
  • ½ tsp red pepper flakes (optional)
  • ¾ cup parmesan cheese
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:

  1. Add 5 cups of warm water to a bowl and soak the cauliflower and mushrooms for 15 minutes. Squeeze away excess liquid and set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to the package's instructions. Set aside.
  3. Add the cauliflower and mushrooms to a food processor and pulse until the pieces are the size of a rice grain.
  4. In a pot, heat the olive oil and butter over medium heat. Once the butter melts, add the onion and garlic and sauté for 4-5 minutes. Stir in the tomato (paste and diced pieces) and cook for 3-4 more minutes. Lastly, add the cauliflower, mushrooms, and ¼ cup of water and let the sauce simmer for 7-8 minutes. Season with rosemary, red pepper flakes, salt, and pepper. Remove the sauce from heat once it reduces to a slightly thick paste.
  5. Transfer the pasta to the sauce and stir in the parmesan and parsley. Serve immediately.

5. General Tso's Cauliflower

Thought that cauliflower didn't have much scope beyond soups and salads? Well, this out-of-the-box recipe proves that the veggie can readily replace meat in just about any situation. Dollop the saucy treat on top of some fried rice, and you'll feel like you just ordered in from your favorite local takeout.

Ingredients:

(For the batter):

  • 4 eggs
  • ½ cup cornstarch
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • ½ cup water
  • 2 tsp salt

(For Tso's sauce):

  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp dried garlic (granulated)
  • ½ tsp ground ginger
  • ½ cup vegetable broth (plus 2 tablespoons)
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 3 tbsp cornstarch

Directions:

  1. In a bowl, add the cauliflower and 3 cups of warm water. Soak for 15 minutes, remove excess liquid, and set aside.
  2. Add all the batter ingredients to a bowl and whisk until a batter forms. If it's too thick, add a few tablespoons of water.
  3. At this point, you can prep the sauce. Heat vegetable oil over medium heat and add the ingredients one-by-one. Cook for 25 minutes or until the sauce has thickened. Set aside.
  4. Fill a pot with sunflower oil and heat over medium heat. Meanwhile, dip the florets into the batter and, batch after batch, transfer them into the pot. Fry them for a couple of minutes on each side or until they turn golden brown. Once done, remove them from the pot and set them on a plate lined with paper towel.
  5. Toss the florets with the sauce and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve over fried rice for a complete dinner.

Do you have any cauliflower recipes that you can't get enough of? We'd love to hear about them in the comments down below!

References:

  1. https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2390/2
  2. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15640516/
  3. https://www.hollandandbarrett.com/the-health-hub/food-drink/nutrition/the-health-benefits-of-cauliflower/
  4. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/diet/cruciferous-vegetables-fact-sheet
  5. https://www.delicious.com.au/recipes/roasted-cauliflower-frittata-garlic-parsley-breadcrumbs-recipe/tuk4z9ig
  6. https://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/cauliflower-recipes/cauliflower-mac-n-cheese/
  7. https://www.wellplated.com/cauliflower-chowder/
  8. https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/cauliflower-bolognese
  9. https://pinchofyum.com/general-tsos-cauliflower